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67,605 math problems solved, Lisbon First in Math program will continue

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LISBON – The First in Math pilot program at Lisbon Central School was met with enthusiasm by students and will continue in the future.

Elementary math teacher David K. Woodside, who oversaw the program at the school, said the first several months of the pilot program were a success.

Since its introduction in February students from first to sixth grade at Lisbon have solved 67,605 math problems through the First in Math program, Mr. Woodside said.

“There have been a lot of positive reactions,” Mr. Woodside said, adding that among the students who participated, teachers noticed improvements in their studies.

The program, which is designed to complement the math curriculum at the school, turns math problems into games that encourage students to progress, Mr. Woodside explained.

And with problems accessible to students wherever they are – so long as they have an internet connection – students have been tackling problems at school, in the library and even at home.

“There’s a lot of room for kids to explore [within the program],” Mr. Woodside said. “Kids are seeing it as a personal challenge.”

With the completion of this year’s pilot program, Lisbon will buy into the program for the next three years, Mr. Woodside said.

Mr. Woodside did not have an estimate for the price of the package, but according to the First in Math website the three-year package costs $6 per student.

This year fourth grade teacher Brittany Sherman’s class came in first place overall, solving 14,310 math problems.

Fourth grade teacher Shelly Robinson’s class came in second with 13,308 problems solved.

Third grade teacher Jamie Albert’s class came in third with 11,442 problems solved.

This year’s top student was Ethan Martin, a fourth grader who solved 2,007 problems.

In second place was third grader Matthew Walker who solved 1,254 problems.

Tyler Gravlin, a fourth grader, came in third after solving 1,020.

Fourth grader Marissa McCabe came in fourth after solving 820 problems and fourth grader Cynthia Snyder came in fifth after solving 659 problems.

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